Programs for Prisoners Correspondence

Education for prisoners is at their own expense through distance education courses or studies completed through the u.s. mail.

Education for prisoners is at their own expense through distance education courses or studies completed through the u.s. mail.

While the case for prison education is clear, with many proven benefits for prisoners, their family, the community and the overall economy, over the past 20 years the U.S. has cut funding for prison education, beginning with Congress passing the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act in 1994 (Read More about the controversial history of prison education). 

In the summer of 2015, the Obama administration temporarily re-instated the Pell Grants, a financial entitlement for students with financial needs. These grants may be available for U.S. prisoners if legislation permits. Read more about the Pell Grants.

Aside from this recent funding addition, the only education for prisoners beyond the high school equivalency level (GED) is at their own expense through distance education courses or studies completed through the U.S. Mail.

While program offerings aren't ideal, correspondence education programs do have benefits. All levels of study and courses are available, from high school to business administration, ministerial and even law.

While we can't help with funding, we can point American prisoners and their families to accessible inmate education programs. Below are links to information and recommended programs for prisoners at different levels.