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Entries in College (14)

Thursday
Jan302014

The Center for Prison Outreach and Education

By Christopher Zoukis  Image courtesy cpoe.pages.tcnj.edu

The Center for Prison Outreach and Education is an extension of the College of New Jersey.  The program is designed for local prison populations.  Faculty members from the college teach classes to inmates in order improve their lives and reduce the possibility of recidivism.  As the program's website asserts, "Research indicates that inmates who participate in educational programs behind bars are less likely to recidivate, and more likely to become productive members of society upon their release. It is the Center's goal to make this transformation a possibility through the offering of credit-bearing courses as well as other forms of academic tutoring and enrichment to those living behind bars.”

To that end, the Center for Prison Outreach and Education has worked to secure funding to continue its important work which is ultimately to facilitate higher education in prisons.

College for Prison Inmates

The program for inmates is delivered by professional instructors who deliver courses that vary widely.  Inmates take courses alongside other College of New Jersey students who enroll in the prison classes.  This sets the program apart from other prison-based programs; the added dimension of mixing 'inside' and 'outside' students has had a positive impact on both sets of students.  Inmates receive college credit for the classes they pass.  All classes are academically standard; that is, all students are held to the same standards and requirements of the coursework. Now that the program's funding allows, inmates have the opportunity to work toward their Associate Degree in Business Management.

Click to read more ...

Monday
Dec302013

Prison Education Program Proposed in N. H.

CONCORD (AP) — Young adult prisoners in New Hampshire would get a chance to shave 13 months off their sentences under a bill heading back to the state Legislature.  Image courtesy www.wesleyan.edu

Lawmakers narrowly defeated a bill two years ago that would allow inmates between 17 and 25 to earn time off their sentences for completing education and rehabilitative programs. The new version of the bill, which is up for a House vote Jan. 8, mandates that inmates fully serve their minimum sentences before becoming eligible for parole.

Under the bill, inmates would get 90 days off their sentences for completing GED programs, 120 days for a high school diploma and 180 days for an associate or bachelor's degree. They also could earn reductions for completing vocational, mental health or family support programming.

Proponents say the bill would encourage rehabilitation and reduce recidivism. They argue that prisoners who have an incentive to better themselves are less of a burden on society.

"Some people will say, 'I don't give a damn,'" said state Rep. Gene Charron, R-Chester, a sponsor of the bill and a former jail superintendent. "But you know what? Most of the people in the state prison are coming home. So how do you want them to come home? With an education? With a trade?"

But Donna Sytek, chairwoman of the state parole board, told the Concord Monitor the bill has several flaws. Inmates currently incarcerated would be eligible for reduced time if the sentencing court approves, but other interested parties, including the victim and the public, aren't in the loop, she said. And she said the bill doesn't account for the fact that many rehabilitative programs have been gutted from the prison system.

"The bill promises more than it can deliver," she said.

(First published by Seacoastonline and used here by permission)

Friday
Nov222013

Distance Learning: Middle Tennessee State University

Correspondence

Correspondence courses involve individual, independent instruction of a student by an instructor on a one-to-one basis. Typically, this will entail study at home, as well as the exchange of materials and evaluations through a mail/courier sImage courtesy www.nashvillescene.comervice. Interaction and feedback between correspondence course faculty and students take the forms of written assignments, testing, evaluations, guidance, and assistance via such media as D2L, print/written word, telephone, fax, e-mail, and other electronic technologies. Computer access and/or a proctored exam will be required as determined by your correspondence instructor. A student must be self-motivated and self-disciplined to successfully complete a correspondence course.

Correspondence courses follow the university Academic Calendar and Tuition and Fees Schedule. University admissions procedures must be followed before registering for these and other distance learning courses. An Admissions application may be completed online and, upon admittance to the university, students may register for courses online via Pipeline.

Course Materials

The links below are to the materials for your course. (If you choose to use this electronic version you do not need to purchase the printed version of the packet but you still need to purchase your textbooks*.) You may choose to print this material from home or a University computer lab or simply save the file on your computer desktop and access it as needed (no printing).

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Monday
Nov182013

Distance Learning: University of North Carolina

Photo courtesy natcom.orgThrough Self-paced Courses, part-time students can earn college credit by taking correspondence or online courses at their own pace. All courses are taught from a distance—no class attendance is required. The courses can be started at any time and are not tied to a semester schedule. Students have nine months to complete the course work.

The institutions offering courses are accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. All courses have been approved by the department offering the course. Courses originate and credit is granted from eight institutions in the University of North Carolina system:

  • Appalachian State University
  • East Carolina University
  • Elizabeth City State University
  • North Carolina State University
  • The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • The University of North Carolina at Greensboro
  • Western Carolina University

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Thursday
Nov142013

Distance Learning: University of North Dakota

College Credit Courses  Image courtesy www.natcom.org

Wish you could “attend” class while sitting in a park? In your living room? Or at the local coffee shop?

At the University of North Dakota, you can take college courses when, where, and how you want! Whether you prefer interactive online courses or independent study, you can get the education you want, the flexibility you need, and the quality you deserve.

Choose from 2 Types of College Credit Courses:

Enroll Anytime = Self-paced independent study courses available online or through correspondence by mail. You may enroll at any time and take up to 9 months to complete your course. Courses do not qualify for financial aid.
Semester-Based = Online courses that follow the standard University schedule. You will interact in a virtual classroom with your instructor and other students as well as follow deadlines for lessons and exams. Courses qualify for financial aid.

Contact Information

Call. Click. Chat.

Local Phone: 701.777.3000

Toll Free: 1.800.CALL.UND (1.800.225.5863)

Email: UND.info@UND.edu

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Saturday
May042013

From Loser to Distinguished Lawyer

By Dianne Frazee-Walker

All odds were against “Frankie” Guzman growing up without a father in the heart of a California neighborhood known for gang activity and crack cocaine rings. His father abandoned the family when Guzman was only three-years old.  Guzman was raised by a mother who commuted to the affluent community of Malibu, cleaning houses to support her family. By the time Guzman was an adolescent his father was incarcerated in a federal prison for attempting to cross the Mexican border with a large amount of cash.  Frank Guzman, Jr. / Image courtesy vcstar.com

Guzman’s brother “Freddie” was arrested when he was 17 for shooting a gang rival at a party. He was convicted of second degree murder and sentenced to 17 years to life in prison.

Guzman was enthralled by his brother and wanted to be with him even if it meant joining him in prison.

With no immediate male role model Guzman was on a downhill slope and going down fast.  His high school GPA went down to 0.8 and he was expelled from school for a fight in the boy’s restroom.

But Guzman’s troubles did not end there.   

Two weeks after being suspended from school, Guzman’s wish to be just like his big brother Freddie came true when he was arrested at 15. He and his friend stole a car and robbed a liquor store at gun point. Guzman was sentenced to 15 years at the California Youth Authority.

During incarceration Guzman had plenty of time to earn his GED -- twice. He made valuable use of his time attending every class he possibly could while confined behind bars.

Just when Guzman was beginning to be inspired by education, events in the outside world crumbled his new found motivation for success.

 Guzman’s uncle, the only male role model he had left that was not behind bars, passed away after a long addiction to drugs and alcohol and his best friend was killed in a gang fight.

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Wednesday
Feb272013

Prison Education: The Correspondence Method

By Christopher Zoukis

In prisons across the country a GED is typically the highest level of academic achievement that is facilitated by the prison administration. The administration's focus, in terms of education, is almost exclusively upon how fast they can funnel their prison's population through their GED programs. It's a never-ending cycle that ends with each prisoner earning a GED and starts over with the next prisoner who has yet to earn one. While a good first step, it dooms many to failure. It does so by starting the prisoner on an academic tract, but stopping them upon attainment of the GED.

The single-minded focus of GED attainment creates a void for prison systems nationwide. This void is education above-and-beyond the GED. Some prisons offer Adult Basic Education or Adult Continuing Education (of which I am an instructor) courses, but rarely do any offer educational programs at the career or university level. This level of study, the credentialing level, is desperately needed by each and every prisoner because studies at this level translate directly into lower recidivism rates and jobs upon release.

For the prisoner who desires to advance their education above the level of studies offered by their prison

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